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John Frame & Steve Childers record Q & A session for Applied Theology Project books and courses

Frame and Childers draw from their more than 70 combined years as seminary professors to help you renew your mind, heart, and life in this excerpt below from the first chapter and lesson in the Applied Theology Project: A Systematic Theologian and a Practical Theologian Apply Theology to Life by John Frame and Steve Childers. Sign up below to receive the latest updates.

So, Why Do We Study Theology?

We saw earlier how theology can be understood as a “study of God,” based on the meaning of the word theology. But the word logos, from which we get the word, theo-logy, conveys not only the idea of the study of God, but also the knowledge of God that is the result of that study. This brings us to a fuller  definition of theology as a study of God in Scripture to know God. But how can we, as mere creatures, know the creator? Isn’t it arrogant, or even delusional, even to claim we can know God?

Here we raise  another foundational pillar in our study of God. The Scriptures teach that God is incomprehensible. Through the prophet Isaiah, God declares his incomprehensible ways:

“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, declares the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts (Isa 55:8-9).”

In the New Testament, the Apostle echoes Isaiah when he writes,

“Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments and how inscrutable his ways (Rom 11:34-35)!”

Although the Scriptures teach God is incomprehensible, they also teach that God is knowable. Because God is incomprehensible does not mean he is unknowable. Of course, we cannot know God exhaustively and completely. Only God knows himself at that level. But we can still know God. Paul describes his knowledge now in comparison what his knowledge will be like in the age to come:

“For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I have been fully known (1 Cor 13:12).”

Three Levels of Knowing God

Frame records lesson 19 of 24 in the Applied Theology Project.

In his classic book, Knowing God, J.I. Packer describes three types or levels of knowing God: 1) knowing about God, 2) Knowing about godliness, and 3) knowing God personally. These three ways of knowing God should not be understood as being contradictory but complementary. You must know about God in order to know about godliness and to know God. But the problem is you can know about God without being truly godly, and without really knowing God.

In all my (Steve) years as a seminary professor, I’ve known people who know far more about God than I’ll probably ever know. But I’m deeply sorry to say that some of them did not really know God. I’m not saying they were not sincere followers of Christ. But the testimony of almost all who were close to them, including their closest family and friends, is that they understood and taught the bible very well. But they did not seem to know the God of the bible very well.

Just as you can know a lot about a person and their ways and not really know that person, so you can know a lot about God and about godliness, i.e. spiritual disciplines, and not really know God. Our reason for studying theology is not merely to know about God and about godliness, but to know God personally.

Our reason for studying theology is not merely to know about God and about godliness, but to know God personally.

Prior to his conversion, the Apostle Paul knew a lot about God and godliness, he used the term righteousness, but he didn’t really know God. As part of his list of religious accomplishments, Paul included:

… circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee; as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless (Phil 3:5-6).

After reciting his prestigious, religious resume, giving clear evidence of his knowledge of God and godliness, Paul says he counts all that knowledge of God and godliness as nothing, in comparison with truly knowing Christ as Lord:

But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ. Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith–that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death,  that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead (Phil 3:8-11).

A Deeper Knowledge of God

The word Paul uses here for “knowing” Christ is the most common Greek word gnosis that can have a range of meanings according to its context.

Sometimes, when Paul wants to convey the idea of a deeper, more full, and intense knowledge, he uses the word epignosis adding the Greek preposition epi to the front of the Greek word for knowledge (gnosis).[1] In Colossians 1:9, Paul tells the Christians at Colossae that he is praying they will be filled with this deeper knowledge, saying:

“And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge (epignosis) of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding.”

The deeper knowledge of God’s will Paul refers to here, is not just a general knowledge, but a knowledge rooted in “all spiritual wisdom and understanding.”

Sometimes, when Paul wants to convey the idea of a deeper, more full, and intense knowledge, he uses the Greek word epignosis.

We see this again, in Philippians 1:9, when Paul tells the Christians at Philippi what he is praying for them, using the same Greek word, epignosis:

“And it is my prayer that your love may abound more and more, with knowledge (epignosis) and all discernment (Phil 1:9).”

The deeper knowledge Paul prays will be theirs is not merely a general knowledge, but a knowledge rooted in all discernment. When the Apostle Paul refers to the Jewish people, his dearly loved family and friends, he writes,

“ Brothers, my heart’s desire and prayer to God for them is that they may be saved (Rom 10:1).”

Paul then describes the kind of knowledge about God that was held by his beloved Jews:

“For I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge (epignosis). For, being ignorant of the righteousness of God, and seeking to establish their own, they did not submit to God’s righteousness (Rom 10:2-4).”

Paul is saying that the Jews have a sincere knowledge and zeal about God and about godliness (righteousness), but it is not a true knowledge of God (epignosis).

Eternal Life is Knowing God

Toward the end of Jesus’ ministry on earth, the Bible tells us He lifted up His eyes to heaven and prayed to the Father on behalf of all His followers, saying,

“And this is eternal life, that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent (John 17:3).”

Although Jesus uses the more common word for knowledge here, gnosis, the context makes very clear that this knowledge of God is the very essence of eternal life–not merely knowing about God, or about godliness–but truly knowing God with a deeper, more personal, saving knowledge, that can only be found in Jesus Christ.

Frame summarizes it for us this way: “If you say that theology is ‘knowing God,’ you make it a personal activity, rather than an academic one. Knowing God is something more than knowing about God. It is a personal relationship, like knowing a close friend.”

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[1] J.B. Lightfoot, Saint Paul’s Epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon, London: Macmillan & Company, Limited, 1927, p. 136

July 4 Shirtless ManJPGIt’s a 4th of July I will never forget. And neither will our guests. Our celebration began normally. Becky and I had several seminary students over to our home for an old fashioned hamburger, hot dog, baked beans, etc. spread.

As it started to get dark, we all drove to our neighborhood fireworks display on the edge of a small lake near our home. A relatively small crowd of a few hundred neighbors were there. A few of the students brought to my attention that the blaring music was very boomer–70’s hard rock. Hadn’t noticed it except for my involuntary head-banging.

It was a very Norman Rockwell sort of scene with kids and dogs running around as spectacular fireworks were exploding high in the air.

What happened next is still hard for me to believe. Just after a beautiful display of fireworks over the lake had ended, a shirtless man walked over near the base where these very high-powered, professional fireworks were being launched.

He then handed his beer can to another man, who had a large American flag in his other hand, and then reached over and picked up one of the large boxes of fireworks-apparently scheduled to be shot off for the next round. I still can’t believe what happened next. This man hoisted the large, heavy box of very powerful, highly explosive fireworks over the top of his head and lifted the box up as high as his arms could reach.

Then this man started walking from the edge of the lake toward the broad yellow tape that was designed to keep the crowd (us) at a safe distance from these potentially dangerous explosives. He stopped about 10-15 feet before the yellow tape, with his arms still fully extended as high as they could go, when the first sparks began to shoot from the huge bottom of the large box of fireworks.

Standing about 6 feet away from this shirtless man was his buddy with the can of beer in one hand and raising up the American flag in the other.

If you look very closely at the video screenshot above (from my trusty iPhone), you can see this shirtless man with his hands held high above him holding the box from which all the fireworks are starting to explode. And if you look to the right of this man (his left) you’ll see his buddy, who has a big American flag in his right hand that you can’t see because it’s behind the fire. If you look closely you can even see the yellow tape (between these 2 men and the crowd in front of us) supposedly meant to keep us a safe distance from the fireworks.

What took place next only lasted for 7 seconds before the shirtless man had to throw down the exploding fireworks box. But everyone with us that evening said they will probably never have another 4th of July when they don’t remember this one. Immediately after the explosions and balls of fire stopped shooting at us, one of the seminary students, Nolan, yelled out,

“That one nearly killed you Steve! We’re lucky to be alive! We’re lucky to be alive! Friendly fire!  We just came under attack! This is unprecedented in the American society! We just came under attack at our own fireworks show!”

Becky and I think our favorite Thank You note came from another student, Tim, who wrote,

Thanks again for having us over for the 4th. It was one I’m certain we’ll never forget. It was the first time I was shot at by a shirtless man while his buddy held his beer and waved an American flag. I’d like to think that this is what the Founding Fathers would have wanted. “Give me drunk fireworks, or give me death.”

To help make your 4th of July weekend more memorable, I’ve just posted below the video I took of those 7 seconds, along with some slower instant replays so you can see the most amazing and frightening fireworks display I’ve ever seen.

You’ll also hear the adrenaline-soaked comments made by some members of our group immediately after we stopped being fired on. And If you watch the video carefully, you’ll see why Nolan screamed, “That one nearly killed you Steve!”

If you’d like to see this 3-minute video Click Here.

Or watch below:

Drs. John Frame and Steve Childers compiled the top 100 books that have influenced the thought of Frame. This list is published in John Frame’s Selected Shorter Writings, Volume 1, by P&R Publishing.

 

Anselm. Works of St. Anselm: Proslogium, Monologium, An Appendix in Behalf of the Fool, and Cur Deus Homo. Forgotten Books, 2007.

 

Aquinas, Thomas. The Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas. Translated by Fathers of the English Dominican Provinc. Christian Classics, 1981.

 

Athanasius. On the Incarnation. Empire Books, 2012.

 

Augustine. The City of God. Translated by Marcus Dods. Hendrickson Publishers, 2009.

________. Confessions. Simon & Brown, 2012.

________. On the Trinity. Edited by Paul A. Boer Sr. and William G. T. Shedd D.D. Translated by Rev. Arthur West Haddan B.D. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.

 

Bavinck, Herman. Our Reasonable Faith. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1956.

________. Reformed Dogmatics. Baker Academic, 2008.

________. Selected Shorter Works. Monergism Books, 2011.

 

Berkouwer, G. C. Studies in Dogmatics: The Providence of God. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1952.

 

Calvin, John. Calvin’s Commentaries, 23 Vol. 500th ed. Baker Books, 2009.

________. The Institutes of Christian Religion. Edited by Tony Lane and Hilary Osborne. Reprint. Baker Academic, 1987.

 

Clark, Gordon H. Christian View of Men and Things. 3rd ed. Trinity Foundation, 1998.

 

Clowney, Edmund P. Called to the Ministry. P & R Publishing, 1976.

________. Christian Meditation. Regent College Publishing, 1979.

________. The Church. IVP Academic, 1995.

________. How Jesus Transforms The Ten Commandments. Edited by Rebecca Clowney Jones. annotated ed. P & R Publishing, 2007.

________. Preaching and Biblical Theology. P & R Publishing, 2002.

________. Preaching Christ in All of Scripture. Crossway, 2003.

________. The Unfolding Mystery: Discovering Christ in the Old Testament. Presbyterian & Reformed Pub Co, 1991.

 

Edwards, Jonathan. Freedom of the Will. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2013.

________. The Life and Diary of David Brainerd. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.

________. Religious Affections. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2009.

________. Selected Sermons of Jonathan Edwards. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.

________. Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. Empire Books, 2012.

 

Gerstner, John H. Jonathan Edwards: A Mini-Theology. Soli Deo Gloria Ministries, 2003.

________. The Problem of Pleasure: Why Good Things Happen to Bad People. Soli Deo Gloria Ministries, 2003.

________. Reasons For Faith. Nabu Press, 2011.

________. Wrongly Dividing the Word of Truth: A Critique of Dispensationalism. 3rd ed. Nicene Council, 2009.

Gerstner, John H., Arthur W. Lindsley, and R. C. Sproul. Classical Apologetics. 1st ed. Zondervan, 1984.

 

Hodge, Charles. Systematic Theology. Reprinted 1981. Hendrickson Publishers, 1999.

 

Kant, Immanuel. Critique of Pure Reason. Edited by Marcus Weigelt. Translated by Marcus Weigelt and Max Muller. Revised. Penguin Classics, 2008.

 

Kline, Meredith G. Images of the Spirit. 0 ed. Wipf & Stock Publishers, 1999.

­­________. The Structure of Biblical Authority. Wipf & Stock Publishers, 1997.

 

Kuyper, Abraham. Lectures on Calvinism. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1943.

________. Particular Grace: A Defense of God’s Sovereignty in Salvation. First ed. Reformed Free Publishing Association, 2001.

________. Rooted & Grounded: The Church as Organism and Institution. Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty, 2013.

________. Sacred Theology. Sovereign Grace Publishers Inc., 2001.

________. To Be Near Unto God. Forgotten Books, 2012.

 

Lewis, C. S. Mere Christianity [Deckle Edge] Publisher: Harper San Francisco; 3th (third) Edition Text Only, 2001.

________. Miracles. HarperOne, 2001.

 

Luther, Martin. The Bondage of the Will. Empire Books, 2012.

________. Commentary on Galatians. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.

________. Commentary on Romans. Translated by J. Theodore Mueller. Kregel Classics, 2003.

________. The Freedom of a Christian. Edited by Mark D. Tranvik. Fortress Press, 2008.

________. Luther’s Large Catechism: A Contemporary Translation With Study Questions. Concordia Publishing House, 1988.

________. Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses. Translated by C. M. Jacobs. Fortress Press, 1957.

________. Treatise on Good Works: Luther Study Edition. Luther study ed. Fortress Press, 2012.

 

Machen, John Gresham. Christianity and Liberalism. BiblioBazaar, 2009.

 

Miller, C. John. A Faith Worth Sharing: A Lifetime of Conversations About Christ. P & R Publishing, 1999.

________. Outgrowing the Ingrown Church. Zondervan, 1986.

________. Repentance. Christian Literature Crusade, 2009.

Miller, C. John, and Barbara Miller Juliani. Come Back, Barbara. 2nd ed. P & R Publishing, 1997.

 

Murray, John. Christian Baptism. Presbyterian & Reformed Pub Co, 1980.

________. Collected Writings of John Murray: Lectures in Systematic Theology. Banner of Truth, 1991.

________. The Covenant of Grace: A Biblico-Theological Study. P & R Publishing, 1987.

________. The Epistle to the Romans: The English Text with Introduction, Exposition and Notes. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1997.

________. The Imputation of Adam’s Sin. P & R Publishing, 1992.

________. Principles of Conduct: Aspects of Biblical Ethics. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1957.

________. Redemption Accomplished and Applied. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1955.

 

Packer, James I. Fundamentalism and the Word of God: Some Evangelical Principles. Inter-Varsity Fellowship, 1965.

________. Knowing God. 20th Anniversary ed. IVP Books, 1993.

 

Pascal, Blaise. Pensées and Other Writings. Edited by Anthony Levi. Translated by Honor Levi. Oxford University Press, USA, 2008.

 

Piper, John. Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist. Rev Exp. Multnomah Books, 2011.

 

Plato. Meno. Empire Books, 2012.

________. Phaedo. Translated by Benjamin Jowett. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.

 

Poythress, Vern S. In the Beginning Was the Word: Language–A God-Centered Approach. 1st ed. Crossway, 2009.

________. Inerrancy and the Gospels: A God-Centered Approach to the Challenges of Harmonization. 1st ed. Crossway, 2012.

________. Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought. 1st ed. Crossway, 2013.

________. Philosophy, Science, And The Sovereignty Of God. Presbyterian & Reformed Pub Co, 2004.

________. Redeeming Science: A God-Centered Approach. Crossway, 2006.

________. Redeeming Sociology: A God-Centered Approach. Crossway, 2011.

________. The Shadow of Christ in the Law of Moses. Reprint. Presbyterian & Reformed Pub Co, 1995.

________. Symphonic Theology: The Validity of Multiple Perspectives in Theology. P & R Publishing, 2001.

________. What Are Spiritual Gifts? P & R Publishing, 2010.

 

Rushdoony, Rousas John. The Institutes of Biblical Law. P & R Publishing, 1980.

 

Schaeffer, Francis A. Art and the Bible. 2nd ed. IVP Books, 2006.

________. A Christian Manifesto. Crossway, 2005.

________. Escape from Reason. IVP Books, 2006.

________. The God Who Is There. 30th Anniversary ed. IVP Books, 1998.

________. The Great Evangelical Disaster. 1St ed. Crossway, 1984.

________. He Is There and He Is Not Silent. 30th ed. Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 1994.

________. How Should We Then Live? (L’Abri 50th Anniversary Edition): The Rise and Decline of Western Thought and Culture. L’Abri 50th Anniversary ed. Crossway, 2005.

________. True Spirituality. Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 1989.

 

Shepherd, Norman. The Call of Grace: How the Covenant Illuminates Salvation and Evangelism. P & R Publishing, 2000.

________. The Way of Righteousness. Kerygma Press, 2009.

 

Van Til, Cornelius. Christian Apologetics. Edited by William Edgar. 2nd ed. P & R Publishing, 2003.

________. A Christian Theory of Knowledge. First ed. Presbyterian and Reformed Pub. Co, 1969.

________. The Defense of the Faith. Edited by K. Scott Oliphint. 4th ed. P & R Publishing, 2008.

________. Introduction to Systematic Theology: Prolegomena and the Doctrines of Revelation, Scripture, and God. Edited by William Edgar. 2nd ed. P & R Publishing, 2007.

________. Why I Believe in God. Westminster Theological Seminary, 1976.

 

Warfield, B. B. Counterfeit Miracles. Banner of Truth, 1972.

________. Faith and Life. Banner of Truth Trust, 1974.

________. Inspiration and Authority of the Bible. 2nd ed. P & R Publishing, 1980.

________. The Person and Work of Christ. The Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Company, 1989.

________. The Plan of Salvation. 1st ed. Fig, 2013.

________. Saviour of the World. Banner of Truth, 1991.

________. Selected Shorter Writings. Edited by John Meeter. P & R Publishing, 2001.

 

Westminster Assembly of Divines. The Westminster Standards. Great Commission Publications, 2003.

 

Wittgenstein, Ludwig. Philosophical Investigations. Edited by P. M. S. Hacker and Joachim Schulte. 4th ed. Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.